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Jes - 23 - she/her pronouns

hi buddies. this is a sideblog. mostly comics, movies, some tv and lots of whining about attempting to write.
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straight into his maker's arms.
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"'Its tone, language, and story belong in children’s literature,' wrote critic James Wood, in The New Yorker…Days after [Donna Tartt] was awarded the Pulitzer, Wood told Vanity Fair, 'I think that the rapture with which [The Goldfinch] has been received is further proof of the infantilization of our literary culture: a world in which adults go around reading Harry Potter.'"
--

It’s Tartt—But Is It Art?, Evgenia Perez

I’m not really interested in the question of whether or not professional Literary Critics like James Wood (Not James Woods) consider Donna Tartt’s The Goldfinch to be High Literature. I guess they’re the people who make that decision, but it’s a decision that is largely inconsequential to me and my reading habits and the reading habits of most people. This weekend I was at Fisherman’s Wharf and I saw a youngish woman, a tourist, carrying a copy of The Goldfinch around like a baby. It was a hot day and that book is heavy, but she was reading it so hard she was lugging it around everywhere, even to buy an $8 milkshake at a burger place on the bay.

am interested in this quote, though. In the implicit horror of “a world in which adults go around reading Harry Potter.” I don’t know if James Wood wears pearls, but can’t you just picture him clutching them? It’s a funny quote to me, because if anything, what enraged me about The Goldfinch—a book I didn’t really like—was that I felt like it was nowhere near infantile enough. I agree that it seemed a bit like children’s literature, but like children’s literature in which you are required to bring your own sense of joy, wonder, and warmth (BYOJW&W?). The reason adults go around reading Harry Potter is that a lot of High Literature lacks joy, wonder, and warmth. But the world itself doesn’t. And so any story that strives to lack it tends to feel like something other that real life.

There’s been this uptick in book snobbery lately. There was that literal nonsense at Slate, which I think I’ve already made my feelings pretty clear about, and now this. It’s probably too simplistic to note that the things that unnerve literary people are the things that make money—in one case, a book written by a woman; in another, a whole subset read most voraciously by girls. I feel like I stand at a weird juncture in my literary community, with my MFA and my YA novels. On my Twitter timeline, the YA readers/writers cheer for books and readers no matter what or who they are, and the Literary readers/writers agree seem more inclined to agree with the thinkpieces. There’s an undertone of “It’s true! Most readers are stupid, and that’s why my books aren’t selling.” It’s not very difficult to choose a side when one side is so unashamed of their own snobbery. 

I was a snob once, too. When I first started writing short stories in college, I was determined to read only the best, and so I focused on the Western canon, on Hemingway and Faulkner and Jonathan Franzen; I took a small step away from my beloved Harry Potter, understanding it to be different and lesser. It went on that way for a long time, until the summer after my first year in grad school, when I picked up Kelly Link’s Pretty Monsters in the teen section of the Carnegie Library and something shifted in my brain. It was like the curtains had been parted and I suddenly saw that my whole conception of value had been formed and shaped by people who looked exactly the same (people who looked like Hemingway and Faulkner and Franzen), that the world was much bigger than that, much more interesting, and so much more fun it made me want to scream. This is the thing I can’t get over in these conversations—we talk about Literary like it’s not in itself a genre. We talk about books as if it’s just understood that there’s a Universal Good and a Universal Bad, and we act like the Universal Good is not overpopulated with while males, and we act like readers of the Universal Bad don’t know any better.  

Anyway, look. I can read and understand and appreciate High Literature, but usually I don’t. And as we should all well know, it’s our choices that show who we truly are, far more than our abilities. And what I am is happy.

(via katiecoyle)

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"When you realize the wolf is inside of you, that’s when you know. You can’t run from it. No one who loves you can kill the wolf because it’s a part of you."
--

Book quotes that are so good they hurt

-Dellaiva, Ava. “Love Letters to the Dead”

(via lys-s)

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"It seemed … right. A young wolfhound must meet his first wolf someday, but if the wolf sees him as a puppy, if he acts the puppy, the wolf will surely kill him. The wolfhound must be a wolf in the wolf’s eyes even more than in his own, if he is to survive."
-- Lan in The Great Hunt by Robert Jordan (via ageekyreader)
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appleflavoredcandy:

Mermaid Tail Printed Tights - $8.45
Also available in sheer!

shieldsexual:

favorite personality traits of steve rogers:

  • don’t tell me what to do
  • fuck your rules
  • no seriously, your rules are pointless and i’m ignoring them
  • fuck your bullshit
  • double dog dare me
  • lets fucking jump off this building!!!!!
  • i’m annoyed at everything you choose to be but recognize you need help and love 
  • ~*sarcastic compliment*~
  • ~*barely concealed dry insult*~
  • the best tactical mind in the universe, lets plan this shit
  • i love my country that’s why i’m forever critical of it and mindful of the past and concerned for the future
  • loyalty and love above reason

steve rogers personality traits in fandom:

  • what does a microwave do idgi
  • gay people lol amirite
  • sure i’ll do whatever you say
  • math??????????????? science??????????
  • no, i would not like to participate in shenanigans
  • america fuck yeah!!!!!!!!!!!!
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thisradicalchange:


We didn’t know that our activism and our peaceful displays would result in guns literally looking down our eyes. Literally looking down our eyes. Guns.
And I had young people who were willing to die. For justice. 
I had a young person — and he’s definitely the example of many young people that I represent who said "I didn’t think I would make it to twenty-one years old so I’m ready to die now. Let’s do it now."

State senator Maria Chappelle-Nadal (@MariaChappelleN) speaks on the Senate floor about the events she witnessed in Ferguson, Missouri in the weeks following the execution of Mike Brown. Senator Chappelle-Nadal was one of many protesters tear gassed for three hours without reprieve by the Ferguson PD.
She has been consistent and unrelenting in her criticism of Governor Jay Nixon — to the point of tweeting him “FUCK you, Governor!” — for his lack of action over the violation of citizens’ constitutional right to peacefully protest, and passionately vocal about the violent ways in which protesters were abused by the police.
Full video of Senator Chappelle-Nadal’s speech is available for download here (.wmv format). 

thisradicalchange:

We didn’t know that our activism and our peaceful displays would result in guns literally looking down our eyes. Literally looking down our eyes. Guns.

And I had young people who were willing to die. For justice.

I had a young person — and he’s definitely the example of many young people that I represent who said "I didn’t think I would make it to twenty-one years old so I’m ready to die now. Let’s do it now."

State senator Maria Chappelle-Nadal (@MariaChappelleN) speaks on the Senate floor about the events she witnessed in Ferguson, Missouri in the weeks following the execution of Mike Brown. Senator Chappelle-Nadal was one of many protesters tear gassed for three hours without reprieve by the Ferguson PD.

She has been consistent and unrelenting in her criticism of Governor Jay Nixonto the point of tweeting him “FUCK you, Governor!” — for his lack of action over the violation of citizens’ constitutional right to peacefully protest, and passionately vocal about the violent ways in which protesters were abused by the police.

Full video of Senator Chappelle-Nadal’s speech is available for download here (.wmv format). 

virginiawoolfunderwater:

a mix about queer unrequited love ♪♫

"It’s worse when you know the girl you spend every moment thinking of, the girl who makes you nervous and giddy, the girl who has to notice you for you to feel there, could never, ever feel the same way.”

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ahwuhoo:

Can we talk about what’s happening in Scotland yet?

ahwuhoo:

Can we talk about what’s happening in Scotland yet?

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anneboleyns:

Rick O’Connell: a summary