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Jes - 23 - she/her pronouns

hi buddies. this is a sideblog. mostly comics, movies, some tv and lots of whining about attempting to write.
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straight into his maker's arms.
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tawny:

yourdisappointmentappointment:

rockyhorrororg:

…PATION!  As promised a few days ago, here’s the big announcement from Twentieth Century Fox and MAC!

TWENTIETH CENTURY FOX CONSUMER PRODUCTS AND M·A·C COSMETICS ANNOUNCE FABULOUSLY FREAKY ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW COLLECTION

M·A·C To Kick Off Cult Classic Film’s 40th Anniversary Celebration With Collection Available October 2nd

Los Angeles – September 2, 2014 – Twentieth Century Fox Consumer Products and M·A·C Cosmetics kick off the celebration of the 40th anniversary of The Rocky Horror Picture Show in wild style with an untamed M·A·C collaboration, featuring an outrageous collection of hues and products specially designed to recreate the looks of your favorite characters from Richard O’Brien’s cult classic film. Fans will transform into a sex-swapping mad scientist, heroic newlywed, alien from Transylvania or even the time-warped Riff Raff, with an orgy of colour worthy of any midnight mayhem at The Frankenstein Place.

The wonderfully weird collection features lipsticks and lip pencils ($17.50), eye shadow palette ($44.00), glitters and pigment ($23.00), blush ($24.00), powders ($27.50-35.00), liquid eyeliner ($20.00), lashes ($18.50) and more and will be available in stores everywhere on October 2nd and online at http://www.maccosmetics.com/

“It is hard to believe it has been almost 40 years since we released The Rocky Horror Picture Show, but as we approach this milestone anniversary, the film is as outrageously entertaining and relevant as it ever was,” said Lou Adler, executive producer of The Rocky Horror Picture Show. “It has certainly taken on a life of its own, and continues to transcend generations and hold a solid spot in pop culture year after year.”

“As the fortieth anniversary is looming with great…’Antic-i-pation’ lifelong fans and even newbies to the cult of ROCKY will be very excited by the kick-off of this great product line, says Sal Piro “RHPS Fan Club President.” What better response can there be to the audience call-back “LET THERE BE LIPS” !!!!

Holy shit.

omg

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"Of course, you never really forget anyone, but you certainly release them. You stop allowing their history to have any meaning for you today. You let them change their haircut, let them move, let them fall in love again. And when you see this person you have let go, you realize that there is no reason to be sad. The person you knew exists somewhere, but you are separated by too much time to reach them again."
-- Chelsea Fagan, How We Let People Go (via teenager90s)
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glassbottomairplane:

Cool ghost photography by surrealist photographer Cristopher McKenney.

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lil-c0met:

idiot-legs:

do not support your friends who turn out to be rapists.
do not doubt your friends who have been raped.

unfriend the rapists.
protect the abused.

please, please.

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First of all, I was a huge fan of your run on Batgirl, you wrote such a fun and exciting book to read. Was there any other characters that you would have liked to see team up with Steph.

bryanqmiller:

There was a two (or maybe three) parter with Jaime/Blue Beetle that I never got to do before the rug came out from under us - Steph and Jaime bumping into each other at Spring Break (Jaime had snuck away with Paco) and h-a-t-i-n-g each other. But when Black Manta attacks, Blue Beetle and Batgirl get along great.

Later in the series, there could/would/should have been a sequel story with Jaime visiting Gotham U. and (through a series of unfortunate events) Steph winding up bonded with Scarab, and Jaime having to prove his stuff as a “normal” to save Batgirl and the day.

Also, “Star City Sirens” with Mia/Speedy calling on Batgirl for help when Kara/Supergirl comes down with a case of Red Kryptonite poisoning. 


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Helpful Tagging Information

shitrichcollegekidssay:

  • Failing to tag a post as “transmisogyny” and instead only tagging “cissexism/transphobia” when the attack is directed at trans women (ex. use of the t-slur) is an act of erasure and violence.

  • Failing to tag a post as “antiblackness” and instead only tagging “racism” when the attack is directed at black people (ex. use of the n-slur) is an act of erasure and violence
  • Tagging a post anti-(insert race other than black) racism is a microaggression, as it appropriates the framework for talking about antiblackness to other racial groups who have different dynamics (ex. saying “anti-asian racism” when you mean orientalism). The only exceptions to this are antisemitism and anti-Romani racism.
  • If you tag anything “hispanic” or any variant of that word I will side eye you. I hate that gentrifying word, it’s an attempt to make my people palatable by emphasizing our connection to whiteness. 
  • Transphobia isn’t really as coherent as a concept as cissexism is: the words are basically interchangeable, but I favor the latter, because the violence faced by people who are not trans woman is more based in assumptions that they cannot be what they say they are (cissexism) rather than repulsion (described by transphobia). That repulsion is almost always directed at trans women only, described in transmisogyny.
  • It’s good to tag both cissexism and transphobia, because people blacklist the word transphobia, but when you talk about oppressive structures that ALL trans people face, use the word “cissexism” and when you talk about violence faced by trans women call it “transmisogyny,” because that is what it is.
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foxfamilyfeatures:

its ok if you didnt always know you were trans 

its ok if you really felt like your designated gender. its ok if you really were a boy or girl at some point. its ok if you really would rather view your transness as changing from one thing to another (instead of a process of revealing what was already there). its ok if you didnt know that you were trans when you were a kid. its ok if youre only just starting to think about gender stuff now. its ok if you approached transness deliberately, experimentally, as a conscious choice. its ok to approach your gender as mutable 

it doesnt mean your transness is less valid or like the gender you are now is less “real” just because its not something youve always been perfectly aware of. youre great and powerful and whatever you want for yourself in your future right now is important and worthy no matter how long youve wanted it 

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kirk-out:

hey guys this is a rly important announcement i will be going on a year-long hiatus bc theres no wifi at hogwarts ha ha l8r u dirtbags suck it 

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lovestodeepthroat:

soulbrotherv2:

Sexual Relations Between Elite White Women and Enslaved Men in the Antebellum South: A Socio-Historical Analysis

By Jacqueline M. Allain
Sexual Agency, Power, and Consent
According to one historian, “few scholars… have viewed the relationships of enslaved men and free white women through the lens of sexual abuse in part because of gendered assumptions about sexual power” (Foster, p. 459). This is in keeping with both the standard feminist conceptualization of rape as a tool of patriarchal oppression3 as well as the traditional (un-feminist) notion of women as too weak, emotionally and physically, to commit serious crimes, let alone sexual abuse, and the idea that men cannot be raped (Bourke, 2007, pp. 219, 328). However, it is becoming increasingly clear that women, too, are capable of committing sexual offenses and using sex as a means of domination and control (Bourke, pp. 209-248).

[Continue reading at Student Pulse:  The International Student Journal.]


Yup.

lovestodeepthroat:

soulbrotherv2:

Sexual Relations Between Elite White Women and Enslaved Men in the Antebellum South: A Socio-Historical Analysis

By Jacqueline M. Allain

Sexual Agency, Power, and Consent

According to one historian, “few scholars… have viewed the relationships of enslaved men and free white women through the lens of sexual abuse in part because of gendered assumptions about sexual power” (Foster, p. 459). This is in keeping with both the standard feminist conceptualization of rape as a tool of patriarchal oppression3 as well as the traditional (un-feminist) notion of women as too weak, emotionally and physically, to commit serious crimes, let alone sexual abuse, and the idea that men cannot be raped (Bourke, 2007, pp. 219, 328). However, it is becoming increasingly clear that women, too, are capable of committing sexual offenses and using sex as a means of domination and control (Bourke, pp. 209-248).

[Continue reading at Student Pulse:  The International Student Journal.]

Yup.

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